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Monday, May 18, 2020 | History

2 edition of Undernutrition in sub-Saharan Africa found in the catalog.

Undernutrition in sub-Saharan Africa

Peter Svedberg

Undernutrition in sub-Saharan Africa

is there a sex bias?.

by Peter Svedberg

  • 4 Want to read
  • 32 Currently reading

Published by WIDER Publications, World Institute for Development Economics Research in Helsinki .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Children -- Africa, Sub-Saharan -- Nutrition.,
  • Nutrition surveys -- Africa, Sub-Saharan.,
  • Sexism.

  • Edition Notes

    SeriesWIDER working papers -- WP 47, WIDER working papers -- WP 47.
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsTX361.C5
    The Physical Object
    Pagination39 p. ;
    Number of Pages39
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18782946M

    Undernutrition is a direct consequence of diets lacking in sufficient quantities of high quality nutrients and of illness. Obesity is the consequence of excess caloric intake relative to energy use. While the prevalence of obesity across much of sub-Saharan Africa is File Size: KB. [NAIROBI] A programme is helping address undernutrition — insufficient quantity and quality of food intake by a person — in Sub-Saharan Africa through creation of a local platform to assess and discuss challenges. According to UNICEF, about 28 percent of children in Sub-Saharan Africa are underweight. But experts say existing nutrition assessment such as household economy approach face.

    Economic growth is widely considered an effective instrument to combat poverty, and child malnutrition. Though there is a substantial literature on the relationship between economic growth and. Background: Undernutrition remains highly prevalent in low- and middle-income countries, with sub-Saharan Africa and Southern Asia accounting for majority of the cases.

      (). Undernutrition in Sub‐Saharan Africa: Is there a gender bias? The Journal of Development Studies: Vol. 26, No. 3, pp. Cited by: Synopsis A large share of the population in many developing countries suffer from chronic undernutrition. In this book, Professor Svedberg provides a detailed comparative study of undernutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, the two worst affected areas, and provides crucial advice for allthose concerned in development worldwide.


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Undernutrition in sub-Saharan Africa by Peter Svedberg Download PDF EPUB FB2

Undernutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa A Critical Assessment of the Evidence The predominant perception is that the world's food problems are now concentrated in Sub-Saharan Africa. Declining food production and recurrent famine in many African countries are.

Undernutrition in Sub‐Saharan Africa: A Critical Assessment of the Evidence - Oxford Scholarship From 5% to 45% of the population of sub-Saharan Africa appear to be undernourished, depending on the indicator and sources consulted.

This enormous discrepancy calls for a diagnosis of the extent of undernourishment in the region. Description Almost 1 billion people suffer from undernutrition in developing countries.

In this book, Professor Svedberg provides a detailed analytical study of undernutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa, the worst affected area, and provides crucial advice for all those concerned in development worldwide. The paper is part of an extensive study on undernutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa, conducted by the author under the auspices of WIDER.

An earlier version was issued as a seminar paper,IIES, and working paper, 47, by: In Sub-Saharan Africa, the scale of undernutrition is staggering; 58 million children under the age of five are too short for their age (stunted), and 14 million weigh too little for their height (wasted).

A large share of the population in many developing countries suffers from chronic undernutrition. This book provides a detailed comparative study of undernutrition in sub‐Saharan Africa and South Asia, the two worst affected areas, and provides policy advice for those concerned in nutrition‐cum‐development : Peter Svedberg.

A large share of the population in many developing Undernutrition in sub-Saharan Africa book suffer from chronic undernutrition. In this book, Professor Svedberg provides a detailed comparative study of undernutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, the two worst affected areas, and provides crucial advice for all those concerned in development worldwide.

In most of Sub-Saharan Africa increased levels of undernutrition are strongly associated with the age of the child. The decline in nutritional status from birth is astonishingly swift as newborns in many African households face a challenging health environment and, in many cases, receive suboptimal feeding, Cited by: 16 November,Accra/Abidjan/Rome - The number of undernourished people in sub- Saharan Africa has increased mainly due to the impact of conflict and climate change with the situation pointing to the urgent need to build affected communities’ resilience and to find peaceful solutions that strengthen food security, FAO said today.

The prevalence of chronic undernourishment appears to have. Overview of Hidden Hunger in Africa. In sub-Saharan Africa, malnutrition is severe, with many challenges slowing improvement.

Over a third of the population suffers from undernutrition and the broad human, social and economic cost is devastating. Half a million children in sub-Sahara Africa die each year from common diseases because they are not protected by vitamin A. to the understanding of undernutrition in the world"' Development and Cooperation `This volume provides a very thorough analysis of the problem of undernutrition, particularly in developing countries, and with particular reference to South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa.' Aslib Book GuideCited by: Malnutrition prevalence remains alarming: stunting is declining too slowly while wasting still impacts the lives of far too many young children Nearly half of all deaths in children under 5 are attributable to undernutrition; undernutrition puts children at greater risk of dying from common infections, increases the frequency and severity of such infections, and delays recovery.

MOL Viewer. Peanuts, Aflatoxins and Undernutrition in Children in Sub-Saharan Africa. Author to whom correspondence should be addressed. Peanuts (Arachis hypogaea) is an important and affordable source of protein in most of Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and a popular commodity and raw material for peanut butter, paste and cooking by: 9.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, the scale of undernutrition is staggering; 58 million children under the age of five are too short for their age (stunted), and 14 million weigh too little for their height (wasted).Author: Emmanuel Skoufias, Katja Pauliina Vinha, Ryoko Sato.

A large share of the population in many developing countries suffer from chronic undernutrition. In this book, Professor Svedberg provides a detailed comparative study of undernutrition in Sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia, the two worst affected areas, and provides crucial advice for all those concerned in development worldwide.

The book concentrates on the five challenges that undernutrition. Geographically, the majority of the undernutrition burden exists in Sub-Saharan Africa and South-Central Asia (Bhutta and Salam ). Malnutrition has three commonly used comprehensive types named stunting, wasting and underweight: measured by height for age, weight for height and weight for age indexes respectively.

In sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), one in seven children die before their fifth birthday [].Nearly half of these under five deaths are attributable to underlying undernutrition which manifests as stunting, wasting and growth restriction in utero and micronutrient deficiencies [].Wasting is an indicator of acute malnutrition and is defined as inadequate weight for age and height while stunting which Cited by: 9.

John M. Ashley, in Food Security in the Developing World, Slum Dwellers. Undernutrition is sometimes wrongly believed to be just a rural phenomenon, with many surveys showing a higher incidence of undernutrition in urban areas. While working in Kebbi State in northern Nigeria inthe current author noted that the health clinic visited in the periphery of the capital city.

Additional Physical Format: Online version: Svedberg, Peter. Undernutrition in sub-Saharan Africa. Helsinki, Finland: WIDER Publications, World Institute for Development Economics Research, [].

Undernutrition, especially among young children in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) remains widespread, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa and South Asia.

In Sub-Saharan Africa, the scale of undernutrition is staggering; 58 million children under the age of five are too short for their age (stunted), and 14 million weigh too little for their height.The sub-Saharan Africa region has the highest prevalence of undernutrition, with sparse progress in recent time.

Hidden hunger as a type of undernutrition happens when the intake of micronutrients including vitamins and minerals are inadequate for optimal growth. Poor diet remains the major factor that contributes to micronutrient deficiencies.

Birth registration and child undernutrition in sub-Saharan Africa - Volume 19 Issue 10 - Ornella Comandini, Stefano Cabras, Elisabetta Marini Please note, due to essential maintenance online purchasing will be unavailable between and (GMT) on 23rd November Cited by: